MY BEST BLOGGING ADVICE: LET’S HEAR IT FOR BLOGGIESTA!

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Another Bloggiesta is here, and I am addicted to this opportunity to make changes and visit other bloggers.

In April, I will have been blogging for seven years, but my first blog was pretty much dormant for the first year.  Then I met some other bloggers, and realized that a community enfolded us.  And with each new “meet,” I learned that we could help one another.

My first site was on Blogger, but in 2009, I started adding blogs here on Word Press.  Sheila, of Book Journey, had a WP site and was helpful in telling me how to do various things on my blog.  I got so excited by this new adventure, that I added way too many blogs…mostly on WP.  And then combined a few of them.  I now have eleven, and ten of them are on WP.

What advice could I give the new bloggers?

 

DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK FOR HELP

When I reached out to Sheila, with a question about how to do something on WP, I realized that there is no shame in asking.  And in later years, I have been able to pay it forward with other newbies.  There is a forever link when we connect and help each other.

 

FIND CONNECTIONS IN THE COMMUNITY

It begins, perhaps, when you decide to join one of the memes that proliferate on the blogosphere.  For me, it was It’s Monday, What Are You Reading, followed by Mailbox Monday.  Other memes would join the fold.

By visiting other blogs and commenting, I soon realized that people who comment back might continue to visit, and soon a conversation would flourish.  Conversations and communication are the key.

 

 

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DISCOVER YOUR OWN VOICE

As I read the blogs I visit, I realized that each blogger had a unique style, and imitating others would not work for me.  Although I did tend to develop my own style based on what resonated with me in the blogs of others.

My style is conversational, I guess.  And I love finding images to illustrate what I am saying.

I like to think I occasionally poke fun at myself, identifying myself as OCD or a little bit quirky.  That represents me, personally, and others might recognize that in themselves…or maybe find it amusing.  My Potpourri site is primarily my place for quirkiness.

 

 

 

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DETACH FROM THE DRAMA

Every now and then I read and see a link to something dramatic that is taking place somewhere on the blogosphere.  And it’s not that I am oblivious, but I don’t like to grab onto stories that may or may not be founded in fact.  Or situations that may have no relevance to me.  So…I detach.  It works for me.

 

 

 

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DON’T WORRY ABOUT NUMBERS, OR OTHER PEOPLE’S EXPERTISE

Yes, it is good to learn from others, and to discover how to enhance your presence.  So that you can maximize your own experience.  But not to compete…and let’s face it, when you blog for fun, as I do, it doesn’t do much good to compete with the experts.  LOL

 

 

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AND THAT’S ALL, FOLKS! 

Keep it real, keep it true to your own voice, and connect!

 

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What advice do you have?  What makes blogging fun for you?

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REVIEW: TEN THINGS I’VE LEARNT ABOUT LOVE, BY SARAH BUTLER

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What if the whole of your life you were searching, struggling to find your place in the world?

As the youngest of three daughters, Alice is approaching her thirtieth birthday, but has yet to find her unique connections to the world and to others. She doesn’t mesh with her older sisters, who seem to look upon her as the black sheep. She can feel their criticism whenever they look at her, and they question her choices. Her relationship with Kal has also failed, yet a part of her wants to reconnect with him.

Meanwhile, she has come home to London, to the house near Hampstead Heath, because their father is dying. By the time she gets there, from Mongolia, he is very near the end. She doesn’t feel like she belongs here, and she restlessly longs to be away again. When she sits with her father, she feels as though she needs to ask him something. But does not.

Daniel is a man without a conventional home who has memories of a time and a love, and is now on a quest to find someone. Does he hope to find a place in the world too? Despite his apparent rootlessness, he sees the beauty in the world around him, and remembers love in all its wonder.

Ten Things I’ve Learnt About Love is narrated alternately in the first person voices of Alice and Daniel, and as we watch them seemingly coming to a place of connecting, we also see Alice coping with clearing out her father’s house after his death, taking on most of the responsibility because she has been gone so much.

Why is someone leaving little gifts for her on the wall by the front door? Is the man named Daniel someone she has known? Is he trying to tell her something?

We are left with more questions than answers, although, at the end, there is a sense that Alice has come to some kind of decision about her life, and Daniel seems to have decided something as well. This is a story about love, loss, and finding connections, but it is also a story that reveals our connections to the places where we live and to the past we have left behind. A lovely and poignant tale that made me feel both sad and hopeful. I had wished for more closure for the characters, and then I realized that we can almost write our own ending. 4.5 stars.