book review

REVIEW: THE TROPHY CHILD, BY PAULA DALY

the-trophy-child

 

 

Karen Bloom is not the coddling mother type. She believes in raising her children for success. Some in the neighborhood call her assertive, others say she’s driven, but in gossiping circles she’s known as: the tiger mother. Karen believes that tough discipline is the true art of parenting and that achievement leads to ultimate happiness. She expects her husband and her children to perform at 200 percent—no matter the cost. But in an unending quest for excellence, her seemingly flawless family start to rebel against her.

Her husband Noel is a handsome doctor with a proclivity for alcohol and women. Their prodigy daughter, Bronte, is excelling at school, music lessons, dance classes, and yet she longs to run away. Verity, Noel’s teenage daughter from his first marriage, is starting to display aggressive behavior. And Karen’s son from a previous relationship falls deeper into drug use. When tragedy strikes the Blooms, Karen’s carefully constructed facade begins to fall apart—and once the deadly cracks appear, they are impossible to stop.

My Thoughts: In The Trophy Child, the Bloom family enjoyed a privileged life, with private schools, social connections, and a lovely home in the Lake District. Despite the world of privilege, Karen seemed driven. She was a character almost impossible to like. She wasn’t just questing for excellence for her children and her family. She lashed out on a regular basis, arousing fear, loathing, and anger in those she targeted. Sooner or later, someone would surely strike back.One could almost describe Karen as delusional, as she so firmly believed that her daughter Bronte was gifted, despite evidence to the contrary, and insisted on scheduling every imaginable activity, to her detriment. The child reacted with fatigue and displayed symptoms of stress.

Who would crack first under Karen’s tyrannical regime? What might bring about the toppling of the little kingdom of superiority she has envisioned? How will the family members express their resentments of the roles they are expected to play? Verity, the teenage stepdaughter, is literally overlooked to the point that she has to prepare her own meals and eats separately, while Karen is gallivanting around with Bronte to her activities. Karen’s son, a young adult, lives over the garage and does drugs and lays about with an equally troubled friend.

I was totally engaged in the author’s depiction of the characters, each of them realistic and three-dimensional, with all the emotions one would expect in a family as dysfunctional as this one. I especially enjoyed the character of DS Joanne Aspinall, on hand to help the family with their tragedies. She is diligent, down-to-earth…and she will get the perpetrator, even if she must put her own life in jeopardy. Discovering motives, connections, and the gradual unfolding of secrets led to a very satisfactory culmination. 5 stars.

***My e-ARC came to me from the publisher via NetGalley.

cropped again 5

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21 thoughts on “REVIEW: THE TROPHY CHILD, BY PAULA DALY”

  1. You described this book very well. Karen was a piece of work indeed. I was glad to see Joanne again, as I had liked her character in other Daly books. I need to go back and read the previous book, which I own but neglected to read somehow.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’d really love me to try this one, you’ve made it sound terrific.

    BTW Laurel, how are you doing in northern CA with the disastrous weather I’ve seen on the news. How awful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Diane, and there are parts of Northern CA that are flooding, and even here in the Central part of the state, the foothills and mountains have flooded. I think the waters are receding. I hope the rain is done for now. One weatherman said that we are actually “out of the drought” for now.

      Enjoy your week!

      Like

    1. So true, Kathy…we called them “helicopter moms,” the ones who micromanaged their kids, even “editing” their homework. I liked how this book spotlighted the problems inherent in this behavior.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

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