book review

REVIEW: THE TROPHY CHILD, BY PAULA DALY

the-trophy-child

 

 

Karen Bloom is not the coddling mother type. She believes in raising her children for success. Some in the neighborhood call her assertive, others say she’s driven, but in gossiping circles she’s known as: the tiger mother. Karen believes that tough discipline is the true art of parenting and that achievement leads to ultimate happiness. She expects her husband and her children to perform at 200 percent—no matter the cost. But in an unending quest for excellence, her seemingly flawless family start to rebel against her.

Her husband Noel is a handsome doctor with a proclivity for alcohol and women. Their prodigy daughter, Bronte, is excelling at school, music lessons, dance classes, and yet she longs to run away. Verity, Noel’s teenage daughter from his first marriage, is starting to display aggressive behavior. And Karen’s son from a previous relationship falls deeper into drug use. When tragedy strikes the Blooms, Karen’s carefully constructed facade begins to fall apart—and once the deadly cracks appear, they are impossible to stop.

My Thoughts: In The Trophy Child, the Bloom family enjoyed a privileged life, with private schools, social connections, and a lovely home in the Lake District. Despite the world of privilege, Karen seemed driven. She was a character almost impossible to like. She wasn’t just questing for excellence for her children and her family. She lashed out on a regular basis, arousing fear, loathing, and anger in those she targeted. Sooner or later, someone would surely strike back.One could almost describe Karen as delusional, as she so firmly believed that her daughter Bronte was gifted, despite evidence to the contrary, and insisted on scheduling every imaginable activity, to her detriment. The child reacted with fatigue and displayed symptoms of stress.

Who would crack first under Karen’s tyrannical regime? What might bring about the toppling of the little kingdom of superiority she has envisioned? How will the family members express their resentments of the roles they are expected to play? Verity, the teenage stepdaughter, is literally overlooked to the point that she has to prepare her own meals and eats separately, while Karen is gallivanting around with Bronte to her activities. Karen’s son, a young adult, lives over the garage and does drugs and lays about with an equally troubled friend.

I was totally engaged in the author’s depiction of the characters, each of them realistic and three-dimensional, with all the emotions one would expect in a family as dysfunctional as this one. I especially enjoyed the character of DS Joanne Aspinall, on hand to help the family with their tragedies. She is diligent, down-to-earth…and she will get the perpetrator, even if she must put her own life in jeopardy. Discovering motives, connections, and the gradual unfolding of secrets led to a very satisfactory culmination. 5 stars.

***My e-ARC came to me from the publisher via NetGalley.

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tbr stacks

TBR PATROL: ARE MY NUMBERS DICTATING MY LIFE?

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It is time to check out my numbers for the year so far.

For the Read the Books You Buy Challenge, I have read and reviewed 19 books so far.  Ten of those books were purchased in January 2017, and nine were purchased in the second half of 2016, which still qualifies them for this challenge.

Books Purchased in January:  20 – so half of them have been read

Books Purchased in February so far:  9 – and I’ve read none of them.

***

Books Purchased Between July – December 2016:  71

Books Read:  53

Books Unread for the second half of 2016:  18

 

Obviously, several of those books from 2016 were read in that same year, and counted for last year’s challenge.

***

So….my work is cut out for me.  But what fun the work has been!  I’ve been enjoying these books. 

As for those purchased before July 2016, some of which go way back to 2014…those are in the TBR Jar…and they will be dealt with…or not.

2014:  Unread Books-  20

2015:  Unread Books –  13

2016:  Unread Books from January – June – 21

***

 

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***

The task seems huge, even insurmountable, but let’s total up all the unread books I’ve purchased since 2014:  81!

The year is new, and I think I can probably put a dent in these numbers.  What do you think?

***

Of course, the review books will take up some time, but so far, I only have 6 NetGalley books to read and review (I’ll probably get more, though).

And as for author review books, I have two waiting…and one Amazon Vine book.

I should probably be mindful of these numbers when making requests.

***

What does your reading year look like so far?  Do my numbers seem manageable?  How about yours?

***

 

 

 

book review

REVIEW: MY HUSBAND’S WIFE, BY JANE CORRY

 

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When young lawyer Lily marries Ed, she’s determined to make a fresh start. To leave the secrets of the past behind. But then she takes on her first murder case and meets Joe. A convicted murderer whom Lily is strangely drawn to. For whom she will soon be willing to risk almost anything.

But Lily is not the only one with secrets. Her next-door neighbor Carla may be only nine, but she has already learned that secrets are powerful things. That they can get her whatever she wants.

When Lily finds Carla on her doorstep sixteen years later, a chain of events is set in motion that can end only one way.

 
My Thoughts: Alternating narrators tell the story of My Husband’s Wife, a tale of so many flawed characters with secrets and lies that bind them together.

Lily was one I was rooting for, despite her painful and troubled past, most of which was revealed in bits and pieces…and then, finally, in greater depth at the end.

Carla was a child when we first met her, and I could feel a bit of sympathy for her, but the manipulative aspects of her personality overwhelmed me, and from then on, I was wary of her.

Joe Thomas was Lily’s first client, one she got off for murdering his fiancé. But life would throw some disconcerting curves her way as she came to realize more about him.

Ed, Lily’s husband, was despicable, in my opinion, as he loved controlling those around him, including and especially Lily, and when he showed so much disdain for her, I wanted bad things to happen to him. He did try to make amends at times, but I could not warm up to him at all.

What would ultimately allow some of these damaged characters to move on from the past? Would punishment help them do so?

A riveting and convoluted page turner that would finally bring a bit of clarity to this reader, while reminding us that we do not really know the people we love. 5 stars.

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first paragraphs, Tuesday Intros/Teasers

LET’S CURL UP WITH “THE TROPHY CHILD”

books-fairytales-tuesday-excerpts

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

My spotlight today turns to an e-ARC from NetGalley, with a release date of March 7, 2017.  The Trophy Child, by Paula Daly, is a richly imagined world of suburban striving and motherly love, an absorbing page-turner about the illusions of perfection and the power games between husband and wife, parent and child.

 

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Intro:  (Monday, September 21)

The girls’ changing room smelled heavily of sweat, mud and a sickly-sweet deodorant that was beginning to irritate the back of her throat.  She didn’t have a lot of enthusiasm for hockey.  Not a lot of enthusiasm for school, full stop, now that she was on a probationary period.  It was to be a period of indeterminate length, during which her behavior would be monitored by a variety of well-meaning professionals.

Verity Bloom:  not quite a lost cause.

Not yet.

***

Teaser:  (Part Two: Monday, October 5)

Verity could hear classical music playing in a far-away room.  She had no idea who the composer was but she recognized the piece from a car-insurance commercial.  After gawping at Jeremy Gleeson’s set of watercolours for what felt like the hundredth time, she decided he must be running late and so she pulled out Educating Rita from her rucksack. (42%).

***

Synopsis:  Paula Daly is acclaimed for her distinctive voice, masterful plotting, and terrifying depictions of ordinary people whose everyday lives are turned upside down through deception and murder. In her unsettling new domestic thriller, The Trophy Child, Daly digs beneath the serene surface of the idyllic suburban Lake District community where families strive for perfection, delivering a suspenseful, surprising story of motherhood and fallibility.

Karen Bloom is not the coddling mother type. She believes in raising her children for success. Some in the neighborhood call her assertive, others say she’s driven, but in gossiping circles she’s known as: the tiger mother. Karen believes that tough discipline is the true art of parenting and that achievement leads to ultimate happiness. She expects her husband and her children to perform at 200 percent—no matter the cost. But in an unending quest for excellence, her seemingly flawless family start to rebel against her.

Her husband Noel is a handsome doctor with a proclivity for alcohol and women. Their prodigy daughter, Bronte, is excelling at school, music lessons, dance classes, and yet she longs to run away. Verity, Noel’s teenage daughter from his first marriage, is starting to display aggressive behavior. And Karen’s son from a previous relationship falls deeper into drug use. When tragedy strikes the Blooms, Karen’s carefully constructed facade begins to fall apart—and once the deadly cracks appear, they are impossible to stop.

***

I love how this author zeroes in on complex family issues and keeps me turning the pages.  What do you think?  Would you keep reading?

***

book review

REVIEW: PRETTY LITTLE WORLD, BY MELISSA DE PINO; ELIZABETH LA BAN

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On a cozy street in Philadelphia, three neighboring families have become the best of friends. They can’t imagine life without one another—until one family outgrows their tiny row house. In a bid to stay together, a crazy idea is born: What if they tear down the walls between their homes and live together under one roof? And so an experiment begins.

My Thoughts: What started as a broken pipe that caused flooding through the homes of the three couples had turned into something more.

Mark, the building expert in their midst realized that something in the original construction was not right. A brick firewall, which should have prevented what happened, is missing. So, after some conversations and a consultation with another builder, the taking down of the walls becomes a solution. And the start of communal living.

But how will the three couples and their assorted children figure out how to live together, sharing the household and the chores, while maintaining any kind of privacy? Will the lines blur, making it impossible to keep any semblance of normalcy? Will the children lose their sense of having their own family? What will the neighbors think, and how can they keep their secret?

Stephanie and Hope were two of the women in the equation, and right away I realized how much I disliked them. Stephanie had no sense of personal space, and seemed to have no problem taking whatever she needed without any consideration as to who owned an item. Hope was judgmental and controlling, expecting the others to meet her expectations.

Celia was the most detached from the trio of women, as she had a high powered job that kept her away a lot.

An illness, some infidelities, and a continued blurring of the lines had me confused about who belonged to whom. I started to get the couples mixed up…was Leo with Hope, or with someone else? Who did Mark turn to after his illness? How would his liaison change the group dynamic?

What ultimately happened in Pretty Little World surprised me…since I expected some of what eventually unfolded. But the final pages had me scratching my head. Could such an experiment be impossible to move beyond? 4 stars.

ratings worms 4-cropped***

book review

REVIEW: THE BAD THINGS, BY MARY-JANE RILEY

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Alex Devlin’s life changed forever fifteen years ago when her sister Sasha’s two small children were snatched in broad daylight. Little Harry’s body was found a few days later, but Millie’s remains were never discovered.

Now Jackie Wood, jailed as an accessory to the twins’ murder, has been released, her conviction quashed by the Appeal Court. Convinced Jackie can reveal where Millie is buried, Alex goes to meet her.

But the unexpected information Wood reveals shocks Alex to the core and threatens to uncover the dark secret she has managed to keep under wraps for the past fifteen years. Because in the end, can we ever really know what is in the hearts of those closest to us?

 
My Thoughts: The Bad Things alternates between the perspectives of Alex Devlin, a journalist whose niece and nephew were kidnapped and murdered, and DI Kate Todd, who worked the case back then.

Now, fifteen years later, we see Alex trying to find out from Jackie Wood where Millie was buried, and also hoping to ward off the discovery of her long-buried secret. If she could uncover the location of a specific object from Jackie Wood, she might be able to contain her shame.

But nothing is coming together in quite the way Alex hoped, and another murder will add to the puzzling elements of the case, leading Alex, the cops, and other journalists down all the wrong pathways.

Sasha, the mother of the deceased children, was a very disturbed character, and I was suspicious of her from the beginning. The stories Alex shared about their childhoods added to the picture of her as a self-absorbed woman capable of anything, and someone who also used her “victim” role to keep everyone at bay. Who would dare to probe beneath the surface of this wounded creature?

Finding the truth was definitely circumvented by numerous corrupt individuals, both family members and police, who would do anything to keep everyone in the dark.

Even when we thought we had most of the answers to our questions, another narrator at the end of the book brought a final revelation. 4.0 stars.

ratings worms 4-cropped***

monthly wrap-up

JANUARY WRAP-UP: A GREAT READING MONTH

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January was a month with so many books to love that it was hard to pick a favorite.  I also read one less book than I did in December, but I read many more pages. (4,585 in December; 5,262 in January).

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Genres:

Psychological Suspense Thrillers/Mysteries

9

Historical Fiction

3

Contemporary Fiction

4

****

Female Writers – 16 (Do I have a bias here?  LOL).

***

Authors New to Me:

Amanda Ortlepp

Kay Kendall

Jane Harper

Kimberly Belle

Susie Steiner

Pam Jenoff

Marcy Dermansky

Claire Seeber

***

So….here are the books I read and reviewed.  Click the titles to read the reviews.  Enjoy sharing your month over at Kathryn’s Book Date.

 

***

 

JANUARY 2017:

1.Always (e-book), by Sarah Jio – 320 pages – (historical/contemporary fiction) – 1/18/17 – (NetGalley – 2/7/17)

2.Claiming Noah, by Amanda Ortlepp (374 pages) – (contemporary fiction) – 1/12/17 (Amazon Vine)

3.Desolation Row (e-book), by Kay Kendall- 310 pages – (historical fiction) – 1/3/17

4.Dry, The (e-book), by Jane Harper – 336 pages – (suspense thriller) – 1/30/17

5.Faultlines (e-book), by Barbara Taylor Sissel – 304 pages – (contemporary fiction) – 1/28/17

6.Marriage Lie, The (e-book), by Kimberly Belle- 352 pages – (suspense thriller) – 1/25/17

7.Missing, Presumed (e-book), by Susie Steiner – 369 pages – (literary mystery) – 1/7/17

8.Never Alone (e-book), by Elizabeth Haynes – 352 pages – (psychological thriller) – 1/20/17

9.Orphan’s Tale, The, by Pam Jenoff – 342 pages – (historical fiction) – 1/1617 (Amazon Vine Review)

10.Other Widow, The (e-book), by Susan Crawford – 334 pages – (suspense thriller) – 1/11/17

11.Red Car, The (e-book), by Marcy Dermansky – 206 pages – (contemporary fiction) – 1/29/17

12.Sleeping Beauty Killer, The (e-book), by Mary Higgins Clark/Alafair Burke – 320 pages – (mystery) – 1/1/17. (First Book Read in 2017)

13.Stepmother, The (e-book), by Claire Seeber – (355 pages) – (psychological thriller) – 1/14/17

14.Sweet Lake, by Christine Nolfi – 332 pages – (contemporary fiction) – 1/23/17 (Author Review Request)

15.Twilight Wife, The (e-book), by A. J. Banner – 304 pages – (psychological thriller) – 1/26/17

16.Woman in Cabin 10, The (e-book), by Ruth Ware – 352 pages – (suspense thriller) – 1/8/17

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NUMBER OF BOOKS READ IN JANUARY 2017:         16

NUMBER OF PAGES READ IN JANUARY 2017:    5,262

BOOKS READ YTD:                                                                  16

 

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FAVORITE FICTION READ IN JANUARY:

 

 

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Tuesday Intros/Teasers

LET’S CURL UP WITH “PRETTY LITTLE WORLD”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s feature is Pretty Little World, by Melissa DePino, “a skilled, funny, and highly engaging examination of family, love, and marriage…This book is a win.” —Meg Mitchell Moore, author of The Admissions…

 

 

 

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Intro:  If Celia had been paying attention, she might have noticed the signs—the pipes clanging much too loudly when she turned on the shower, the water pressure dropping off just enough to prevent her from completely rinsing the conditioner out of her long blond hair, the dirty water that had backed up into the utility sink in the laundry room.  But Celia was never good at noticing things like that.

She had given herself twenty minutes to throw in the laundry, shower, blow-dry her hair, and get dressed before going downstairs to hurry the kids outside for some fresh air.  It was tight, but in about half an hour she had the three of them—two boys and a girl all under the age of seven—dressed and out front to play.  Two big orange cones blocked the end of the small tree-lined city street where she and her husband, Mark, had lived for the past eight years.

***

Teaser:  They sat across the cafe table from each other in the spotless eat-in kitchen area at the back of the house, breaking off pieces of flaky croissant oozing with melted chocolate and sipping their coffee while debating whether or not you could ever have too many shoes.  Still on her spending binge, Stephanie had just bought three pairs in the basement sale at Anthropologie, so she didn’t have much room to talk, even though she was adamant that Nikki weed through the more than forty pairs that she had accumulated over the years. (50%).

***

Synopsis: On a cozy street in Philadelphia, three neighboring families have become the best of friends. They can’t imagine life without one another—until one family outgrows their tiny row house. In a bid to stay together, a crazy idea is born: What if they tear down the walls between their homes and live together under one roof? And so an experiment begins.

Celia and Mark now have the space they need. But is this really what Celia’s increasingly distant husband wants? Stephanie embraces the idea of one big, happy family, but has she considered how it may exacerbate the stark differences between her and her husband, Chris? While Hope always wanted a larger family with Leo, will caring for all the children really satisfy that need?

Behind closed doors, they strive to preserve the closeness they treasure. But when boundaries are blurred, they are forced to question their choices…and reimagine the true meaning of family.

***

What do you think?  Would you keep reading?

***

book review

REVIEW: THE MARRIAGE LIE, BY KIMBERLY BELLE

 

 

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Iris and Will have been married for seven years, and life is as close to perfect as it can be. But on the morning Will flies out for a business trip to Florida, Iris’s happy world comes to an abrupt halt: another plane headed for Seattle has crashed into a field, killing everyone on board and, according to the airline, Will was one of the passengers. 

Grief stricken and confused, Iris is convinced it all must be a huge misunderstanding. Why did Will lie about where he was going? And what else has he lied about? As Iris sets off on a desperate quest to uncover what her husband was keeping from her, the answers she finds shock her to her very core.

My Thoughts: I was immediately caught up in the relationship between Iris and Will: the special moments between them, the stories of how they met and fell in love, and their plans for the future. I wanted that happily-ever-after for them.

Happy moments seem to always signal that events are about to go awry in a big way, so with the news of the plane crash, and how Will had lied about where he was going, I knew I would be waiting with bated breath, wondering what would be unveiled next.

There were characters to be suspicious about, just because of how “too good to be true” they seemed, like Will’s so-called best gym buddy, Corban Hayes. Smooth, handsome, and helpful. What’s not to like? Well, just the fact that he seems too perfect. Just like Will did before the lies started to unfold.

I couldn’t stop turning the pages, wondering what would happen next. Could we trust anybody? Well, Iris’s twin brother Dave seemed to be true blue, and it was great to read the banter between them, the “twin talk” that felt real.

Iris’s parents were wonderful and supportive. Then there was Evan, an attorney, whose wife and daughter were killed in the crash. He would have to be one of the good guys. Right?

The trouble with finding out about lies and secrets…it is hard to trust anybody. Would Iris find the answers she needed? Would the trail of mysterious texts she is receiving lead to answers? What does some missing money from the company where Will worked mean about him and about his associates?

Until the very end of The Marriage Lie, I kept going back and forth in my mind about where the road would lead us, but the journey turned out to be even better than I had imagined. A final tidbit took me to an interesting place. 4.5 stars.

ratings worms 4-cropped***
Read the Books You Buy Challenge

ASSESSING MY PROGRESS: READING MY OWN BOOKS….

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It is early in the year, but I want to take a look at what lies ahead, for this challenge.  As you know, we can count all the books purchased in 2017, and those we read and reviewed for July to December 2016.

Here’s a look at January 2017 Purchases.

As you can see, 14 purchases (so far), and none have been read yet:

 

1.A Mother’s Confession (e-book), by Kelly Rimmer

2.Being Queen Victoria, by Kate Williams

3.Best Awful, The, by Carrie Fisher

4.Dry, The (e-book), by Jane Harper

5.Futures, The (e-book), by Anna Pitoniak

6.Idaho (e-book), by Emily Ruskovich

7.Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk (e-book), by Kathleen Rooney

8.Marriage Lie, The (e-book), by Kimberly Belle

9.Moral Defense, Book 2 (e-book), by Marcia Clark

10.Princess Diarist, The, by Carrie Fisher

11.Rainy Day Women – Austin Starr Book 2 (e-book), by Kay Kendall

12.Things We Didn’t Say (e-book), by Kristina Riggle

13.Twilight Wife, The (e-book), by A. J. Banner

14.Vanishing Year, The (e-book), by Kate Moretti

***

Now let’s look at books purchased from July through December 2016:  I have read 50, with 21 left to go:

 

JULY 2016:

1. Coincidence of Coconut Cake, The (e-book), by Amy E. Riechert

2.  Girl You Lost, The (e-book), by Kathryn Croft

3. In Twenty Years (e-book), by Allison Winn Scotch

4. I’ve Got Sand in All the Wrong Places (e-book), by Lisa Scottoline, et. al.

5.  Melody Lingers On, The (e-book), by Mary Higgins Clark

6.  They May Not Mean To, But They Do (e-book), by Cathleen Schine

7.  This Must Be the Place (e-book), by Maggie O’Farrell

8.  Truly Madly Guilty (e-book), by Liane Moriarty

9.   Truth-Teller’s Lie, The (e-book), by Sophie Hannah

10. Valley of the Dolls, by Jacqueline Susann (50th Anniversary Copy – reread)

***

AUGUST 2016:

1.All the Ugly & Wonderful Things (e-book), by Bryn Greenwood

2. American Girl, The (e-book), by Kate Horsley

3.  American Heiress, by Jeffrey Toobin

4.  Behind Closed Doors (e-book), by B. A. Paris

5. Book that Matters Most, The (e-book), by Ann Hood

6.  Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, by Anne Tyler (reread)

7. Family Tree (e-book), by Susan Wiggs

8.  Firefly Summer (e-book), by Nan Rossiter

9.  I Am No One (e-book), by Patrick Flanery

10. If I Forget You (e-book), by Thomas Christopher Greene

11. I Found You, by Lisa Jewell

12. It Ends with Us (e-book), by Colleen Hoover

13Map of the World, A (e-book), by Jane Hamilton (reread)

14. My Life, My Body, by Marge Piercy

15. Results May Vary (e-book), by Bethany Chase

16. Rosemary:  The Hidden Kennedy Daughter, by Kate Clifford Larson

17.  Silver Linings Playbook (e-book), by Matthew Quick

18. Siracusa (e-book), by Delia Ephron

19. Sister, The (e-book), by Louise Jensen

***

SEPTEMBER 2016:

1.Come and Find Me (e-book), by Hallie Ephron

2. Finding Libbie (e-book), by Deanna Lynn Sletten

3. Kept Woman, The (e-book), by Karin Slaughter

4. Last Good Girl, The (e-book), by Allison Leotta

5.Life She Wants, The (e-book), by Robyn Carr

6. London Train, The (e-book), by Tessa Hadley

7. Some Tame Gazelle (e-book), by Barbara Pym

8. Sting (e-book), by Sandra Brown

9. Watching Edie (e-book), by Camilla Way

***

OCTOBER 2016:

1. Commonwealth (e-book), by Ann Patchett

2. Dollhouse, The (e-book), by Fiona Davis

3.  Echoes of Family (e-book), by Barbara Claypole White

4.  Hot Milk (e-book), by Deborah Levy

5.  Hungry Heart (e-book), by Jennifer Weiner

6. Love Letters, by Debbie Macomber

7.  Mean Streak, by Sandra Brown

8. Mothers, The (e-book), by Brit Bennett

9. Red Car, The (e-book), by Marcy Dermansky

10.Saturday Requiem, by Nicci French

11. Send in the Clowns (e-book), by Julie Mulhern

12. Spelling It Like It Is, by Tori Spelling

13. Stealing Jason Wilde (e-book), by Dee Ernst

***

NOVEMBER 2016:

1. After You (e-book), by JoJo Moyes

2.Another Brooklyn, by Jacqueline Woodson

3.Hillbilly Elegy(e-book), by J. D. Vance

4. Home, by Harlan Coben

5.In a Dark, Dark Wood (e-book), by Ruth Ware

6. Inheriting Edith (e-book), by Zoe Fishman

7. In Her Wake (e-book), by Amanda Jennings

8. Murder Game, The (e-book), by Julie Apple

9. Never Alone (e-book), by Elizabeth Haynes

10. Other Widow, The (e-book), by Susan Crawford

11. Sleeping Beauty Killer, The (Under Suspicion)(e-book), by Mary Higgins Clark/Alafair Burke

12. Sweet Lamb of Heaven (e-book), by Lydia Millet

13. When All the Girls Have Gone (e-book), by Jayne Ann Krentz

14. While You Were Sleeping (e-book), by Kathryn Croft

***

DECEMBER 2016:

1. Bad Things, The (e-book), by Mary-Jane Riley

2.Faultlines (e-book), by Barbara Taylor Sissel

3.Missing, Presumed (e-book), by Susie Steiner

4. Premonition, The (e-book, short story), by Chris Bohjalian

5.Stepmother, The (e-book), by Claire Seeber

6.Sweet William (e-book), by Beryl Bainbridge

7.Talking As Fast As I Can, by Lauren Graham

8.White Trash. The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, by Nancy Isenberg

9.Woman in Cabin 10, The (e-book), by Ruth Ware

***

Now that I’ve visualized my purchases, and what I need to accomplish, I feel confident.  How are you doing on yours?

***